Posts Tagged ‘Classic Cars’

Finished in Black with Red Leather Interior this left hand drive, 1961 registered 1600cc 356B has recorded 54920 kilometres with only two owners and has been recently fully restored.

Click here for the Wikipedia entry for the Porsche 356 – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porsche_356

Offers in excess of 68500 Euros are invited for this 356B (excluding Shipping/Delivery costs)

For further details please give The Car Spy a call on ++44(0)1732 760699 or email sales@thecarspy.net.

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Fifty years ago Ford launched a car that they thought would take away some of the market share that BMC were stealing with their revolutionary Mini. Instead their brand-new ‘Consul Cortina’ created a marketplace all of its own which has pretty much endured to this day in the form of the current Mondeo and the multitude of similar-sized cars from most of the world’s manufacturers – all chasing the same market segment.

Their Cortina (still not sure why they insisted on using the ‘Consul’ moniker) appealed to the 2+2 family of post-war Britain that were hungry to escape the dark past of two world wars and were ravenously consuming the renaissance in music and design that was taking place during the 1960’s. Think Beatles, Mary Quant, Conran and the beautiful E-Type Jaguar as part of a tidal wave of newness that knocked the population off its feet.

The Cortina offered the family man in 1962 a car with clean, modern lines, (relatively) willing engines and performance for a reasonable amount of his hard-earned Pounds, Shillings and Pence – ‘new’ money didn’t come along along until the early 70’s. But there was more to come.

Ford had created a GT version of the Cortina with lowered suspension and – wait for it – 78 BHP over the standard 1500cc engined car which produced a weedy-sounding 60 BHP. Today of course we would expect more power from a sit-on lawnmower but in those days there were very few road cars that would achieve more than 100 BHP. Anything on offer to the general public producing more than that would have fallen very much into the ‘sports car’ category and was often far too expensive for ordinary folk. The Cortina did indeed put a smile on Family Guy’s face.

I had an uncle who once owned a Cortina GT and he drove it hard and fast. I blame that particular car for the love affair I developed later on in life for all things Ford including a Cortina 1600E, a 3.0S Capri in Daytona Yellow and a Scorpio Cosworth (sigh).

Four individuals were the catalyst for the birth of the Lotus Cortina – Colin Chapman, Harry Mundy, Walter Hayes and Keith Duckworth.

Colin Chapman owned Lotus with all of their chassis engineering expertise; Harry Mundy was an engine designer who joined Lotus from Coventry-Climax; Walter Hayes was head-honcho at Ford and Keith Duckworth a highly talented engine tuner (ex-Cosworth).

The four men created the cocktail of ingredients that created a true ‘sports saloon’ that distanced itself from its cousin the Cortina GT and its nearest rival the Mini Cooper. Press reviews were full of praise for the car’s handling and road-holding capabilities comparing it to the track-day Lotus 7 at the time.

On the track the Lotus Cortina inevitably blew everything else into the weeds and quickly became THE car to beat. The Ford Cortina-Lotus (as Ford preferred) is now firmly rooted in the folklore of saloon car racing and will still often make an appearance at classic car racing events today.

There was a simplicity in the approach that Ford took in the overall look of the car that is tasteful and pleasing to the eye. No fancy spoilers or wide arches just quarter-size bumpers, 5.5″ Wheels, Lotus badges and any colour you wanted as long as it was white with a green stripe. However, there is a story that one customer insisted on a blue stripe because he was superstitious about the colour green!

Today most Lotus Cortinas still running would have received an enormous amount of loving attention (and expense) to keep them on the road and their rarity value means that they are achieving high prices when they change hands. Figures in excess of £30000 would be readily paid for cars in top condition and concours examples could write their own cheques.

The forthcoming Baron’s auction on the 28th-29th May happens to feature a Lotus Cortina which has been described as follows:-

“This 1965 registered, Airflow model, Lotus Cortina,  underwent a full restoration in 2008/2009 meaning that GRO 28C is in very good order throughout. The car was produced in July of 1964 but was not sold and registered until March of 1965, Originally an “A frame” car, which was later converted to the more popular leaf spring set up, when used for group 2 historic rallying by the Ecurie Ten team from 1990.  Among the car’s six previous registered owners are the above mentioned Ecurie Ten team and well known and well respected  motoring journalist, Richard Hudson Evans. This car is known to the Lotus Cortina Register.”

The guide price is quoted as £30000 to £40000.

Click here for further details of the car that has been entered plus details of the auction

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Barons have another classic car sale coming up on Tuesday 1st November which is full of highly desirable cars that make you want to max out the overdraft facility.

Most are guaranteed to give an almighty financial hangover after the initial love affair but what the hell, they just don’t make ’em like this anymore.

Amongst the line-up of tempting morsels is a 1971 Mk 1 Ford Escort Mexico (yes please!), a totally original 1966 Austin healey 3000 Mk III, Lotus Elan +2, 1963 Jensen CV8, 1955 Plymouth Belvedere, 1975 BMW 2002 (Baur) Cabriolet, a few Rollers, Jags, Mercs, MG,s, Triumphs and a Chrysler Prowler thrown in for good measure.

In all over 50 cars will be on sale and it’s almost worth going along for a nosey to see how much money these sort of cars are fetching these days.

To see the full list of entrants visit Barons website as follows http://www.barons-auctions.com/entry.php?pageid=93&auctionid=89

In the meantime here is a slideshow of some of the entrants – enjoy!

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Ebullient fans of a bygone era flocked to Brooklands in unprecedented numbers on Saturday, as the best in British classic and sports cars stole the show at Historics’ Autumn auction, which eventually saw 65% of 103 Lots selling.

With 13 Jaguars entered into Historics largest sale to date, all but two found a new home, with the star sale being that of a 1954 Jaguar XK120 Drophead Coupé (DHC), which soared way above its estimate of £37,000 – £42,000, to £67,000.

Two further XK120’s sold, demonstrating their appeal, including a 1953 DHC restoration project example for £25,000, as well as three E-Types – still proving popular in its 50th anniversary year – while a 1965 Mk. II 3.8L Saloon fetched £28,500.

A benefactor of much pre-sale attention, a 1962 Daimler SP250 ‘Dart’ originally acquired as a chase car by the Metropolitan Police, and latterly used as a course car at the world famous Goodwood Revival festival, sold to ‘tin-top’ legend and three-time BTCC champion Win Percy, for £39,500.

The most unusual vehicle on offer at Historics’ sale – who has previously brought a Batmobile, Ghostbuster car and Monkeemobile to auction – was a 1973 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI hearse by Mulliner Park Ward, which sold for £24,600.

With a seeming surge in interest amongst first-time-buyers and enthusiasts new to the hobby, it was no surprise to see a number of popular, low-cost, usable classic cars find new homes. 

A 1977 Jaguar XJ6 Coupe – benefitting from some celebrity interest – eventually sold online via I-Bidder for £6,000, whilst a 1974 MGB GT V8 sold for £6,750, a 1969 Morris Mini Cooper S Mk. II reached £9,750, and a 1976 Triumph Stag Mk. II went for over double its estimate at £11,500.

As well as ample opportunity for the first-time-buyer, Historics also presented a number of restoration projects to a packed audience, with no shortage of savvy investors snapping up all but one of an intriguing collection of cars.

One of five Bristol’s entered, a 1949 Bristol 401 Coupé by Touring of Milan sold for £7,250, while a rarely seen Hotchkiss Cabourg 413 from 1934 sold for £6,250.  Strong prices for the Lancia Aurelia B20 in recent years dictated that a restoration project offered at no reserve would see fervent bidding, and so it proved, with the final hammer price £26,000.

As a chance to acquire a piece or become a part of motoring history however, a 1923 La France Raceabout presented too good an opportunity to resist for one enthusiast, who eventually paid £20,500 for the non-moving Raceabout.

Besides British buys, there was strong interest in an eclectic array of European classics, with two Ferrari’s and a Maserati Merak SS finding new owners, and a 1973 Alfa Romeo GT 1300 Junior Zagato attracting global interest via I-Bidder and the telephones before selling for £24,500.

Commenting on the successful sale, Historics’ Auction Director Edward Bridger-Stille remarked that: “It demonstrates that our customers still crave that satisfaction derived from either owning an eminently usable classic car, or becoming immersed in a hands-on restoration project.

“With over 500 people attending on the day, our customers continue to show their support, and we look forward to delivering another excellent offering of classic and collectable cars at our Spring sale in February,” he concluded.

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Britain’s motorists are increasingly enjoying a love-in with the days of old, with booming interest in getting behind the wheel of a classic car.

Whilst private new car sales are floundering*, specialist classic car auction company Historics at Brooklands reports a bullish market, particularly amongst first-time buyers of a retro set of wheels.

“There is an undisputable financial argument against buying even a modest newish car if it’s not driven a great deal, as it can suffer high insurance and maintenance costs and continuing depreciation,” says Historics’ Auction Director, Edward Bridger-Stille.

“In contrast, for around £5,000 you could drive from our auction an original 1970’s British sports car that will give you immense fun and low running costs, and relax in the knowledge that a good cared for car is likely to appreciate in value.”

Marcus Atkinson of classic car insurers, Hagerty International, agrees:

“We have a high level of interest from first-time classic car buyers.  They are attracted by the sheer enjoyment of ownership, and discover it’s a far better way of looking after a few thousand pounds than leaving it in the bank.  And we can comprehensively insure a well-looked after first-time classic for under £100 per year on a limited mileage policy,” he added.

Amongst 100 fascinating classic cars and motorcycles of all ages and values lined up at Historics’ next auction on Saturday October 22nd, are a selection of perfect first-time classic buys, including a 1974 MGB GT V8 (£5,000 – £8,000), a 1976 Triumph Stag Mk. II (£4,000 – £6,000), a 1977 Jaguar XJ6 Coupé (£4,000 – £6,000) and a 1977 Reliant Scimitar GTE (£4,000 – £6,000).

And for those to whom classic car ownership also means rolled-up sleeves and spanners, the Historics’ auction provides the ideal hunting ground for a classic car requiring DIY input, from modest repairs to full restoration.

The 18-strong project car offering at the sale includes no fewer than five Bristol saloons and coupés, a 1965 MGB Roadster, a 1963 Jaguar Mk. II Saloon 3.4L Manual Overdrive and a 1954 Lancia Aurelia B20 GT Series IV, all with no reserve, as well as a 1966 Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint (£8,000 – £10,000), a 1957 Wolesley 6/90 Series II (£3,000 – £5,000) and a 1953 Jaguar XK120 Drophead Coupé (£15,000 – £20,000).

“Most classic car owners enjoy a level of self-maintenance of their pride and joy, from simple tinkering to major sessions burning the midnight oil,” says Bridger-Stille. “And unlike modern-day cars festooned with electronic systems, they are generally very simple and rewarding to work on,” he concluded.

For more information, and to attend the Historics at Brooklands auction, call 0800 988 3838, e-mail: auctions@historics.co.uk, or see the website, www.historics.co.uk.  Viewing of all Lots is possible on Friday October 21st between 10.00am – 8.00pm and on the day of sale prior to the auction commencing with automobilia at 11.30am and cars at 14:00pm.  Entry by catalogue only, available prior to, or on the day of the auction.

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This 1987 928 S4 is fitted with Porsche’s gloriously smooth 320 BHP 5.0 litre V8, quad-cam engine coupled to the very rare 5-speed manual gearbox option. Only around 15% of all 928s had a manual gearbox and are highly sought after today.

This stunning early S4 has the lift-up spoiler and the rare option of a Limited Slip Differential. The car is finished in Rock Green metallic (looks like dark grey) with a beautiful mid green full leather interior. This stunning S4 has covered 114,000 miles with a full and comprehensive service history since new, detailed in the original Porsche pack along with all handbooks and spare keys.

In the last four thousand miles it has received much time, care and a large sum of money lavished on it to make it one of the nicest examples of a 928 available on the market today. The car received a documented windows-out full respray in 2008 at a cost of nearly £6500 and the paintwork remains in beautiful condition.

It also had a full top-end engine rebuild using rebuilt GTS cylinder heads and new cam chain tensioners, chains and a new water pump. A full brake rebuild by GT One costing £1500 was carried out one thousand miles ago and all worn or slightly marked exterior or interior trim items have been replaced with genuine Porsche items.

There are invoices for over £4000 alone for these parts including £500 for new windscreen wiper arms! All recent mechanical servicing and repairs have carried out by RGA Porsche and all bills are included in the file.

The specification of the car includes electric windows and sunroof, electric seats, air conditioning (not tested), and a CD player. The wheels are Porsche Cup items as are the mirrors.

This is a superb, powerful classic motor car that has had no expense spared to maintain its fine condition and is on sale at £SOLD

Click here for a slide show of over 20 images

For further information please call us on 01474 854490 or email sales@thecarspy.net

How cute is this car? This delightful right-hand-drive 1970 Fiat 500L is finished in mid-blue with a dark tan interior and is fitted with a four speed manual gearbox, sunroof, chrome luggage rack plus front and rear chrome bumper bars.

This lovely 500 was restored a few years ago and is in immaculate order throughout. The engine has recently received a top-end overhaul and the gearbox has been replaced. The interior trim is unmarked, showing no wear and tear and the sunroof is like new.

The bodywork has beautiful paintwork and shows no rust problems whatsoever. The underside is also clean and corrosion free. A beautiful example of the iconic Fiat 500 and ready to enjoy at £7495!

Click here for a slide show of over 20 images

For further information please call us on 01474 854490 or email sales@thecarspy.net